Compare the weight of your motor

Discussion in 'General Tech' started by PJ McCoy, Jan 6, 2018.

  1. PJ McCoy

    PJ McCoy Active Member

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  2. PJ McCoy

    PJ McCoy Active Member

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    Im foing to copy and paste it to a file for caddy info on desk top.:thumbup:
     
  3. PJ McCoy

    PJ McCoy Active Member

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    Comparing the 350 chevy i see different years having different weight. Might be why all the confusion about a 350 vs 500 weight battle. Interesting to me is all early motors were very heavy. Look at the Chrysler motors. Then as they get newer the weight goes down.
    CARB emissions is KING.
    Anyway, fun facts
    PJ
     
  4. MIHELA

    MIHELA Member

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    I have a copy of Motor Trend from 1962, the car of the year issue. There was an extensive article about the brand new at the time light weight casting techniques that were starting to be employed. You will see a sharp downward trend in the mid 60's in engine weights due to this, it is obviously cheaper to use less metal in the block, it didn't have that much to do with fuel economy standards.
     
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  5. 8ad-f85

    8ad-f85 Well-Known Member

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    Cast in bellhousing, timing cover, partial valley cover, and sometimes Y block was the norm for older generation V8's.
    Cylinder walls aren't thicker on many in the early 60's.
    Even over the 10-20lbs in a block X 100,000 units, I'd have to imagine getting more pours from a bowl of iron is also very cost effective.
     
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  6. pila78

    pila78 Well-Known Member

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    The early Chevy small blocks, 265 & 283, could be bored around 3/16" over size, and maybe 1/4" over. Don't remember the details, but we used Buick pistons in the 283/301 combo ... The 63 blocks, as I recall, were the light weight beginning, with thinner cylinder walls
    I used an aluminum radiator, to help with the extra weight of the 500 versus the SBC. The Edelbrock 2115 is too tall, or I would have used one, to help with the weight reduction..
     
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  7. 8ad-f85

    8ad-f85 Well-Known Member

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    There were a few 401/425 Buicks that could take the bigger bore of the two, but thick walls were supposedly the result of unpredictable production.
     

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